Tuesday, May 31, 2016

ABC Reads: May 2016


Hellooo friends and welcome back to the ABC Reads link up! We're linking up to share the books we've read in May and the letters we can check off our lists. 

Need a refresher on what the ABC Reads challenge is all about? Never fear, we've got you covered: 

What does the challenge entail? Well, I'm glad you asked. There are 26 letters of the alphabet and we challenge you, during the course of 2016, to read a book that starts with each letter. For example, Atonement (A), The Bell Jar (B), Catching Fire (C), and so on. Makes sense, right? You don't need to go in order - if you want to start with S, go for it. We're easy to please around these parts. On the last day of each month, we'll host a link-up for you to share your ABC Reads.  We will award one point for each letter you review AND a bonus point for linking up with us!  At the end of the year (or when the first participant reviews a book beginning with each of the 26 letters), the winner will be awarded a $30 Amazon gift card. 

Pretty easy, right? And if you didn't get a chance to link up last month - no worries at all. Feel free to jump in with us any time!

OK, so let's get to it. What did you guys read this month? How many letters did you check off? Here's my progress (May books in blue): 

A: (The) Alchemist, by Paulo Coelho. Completed March 2016. 
B: Better Than Before, by Gretchen Rubin. Completed February 2016. 
C: (The) City of Mirrors, by Justin Cronin. Completed May 2016. 
D:  Dark Witch, by Nora Roberts. Completed April 2016. 
E:  Europe on 5 Wrong Turns A Day, by Doug Mack. Completed April 2016. 
F:  Finders Keepers, by Stephen King. Completed January 2016. 
G: (The) Gifts of Imperfection, by Brene Brown. Completed January 2016. 
H: (The) Hereafter, by Jessica Bucher. Completed April 2016. 
I
J
K
L: (The) Last Song, by Nicholas Sparks. Completed January 2016. 
M: (The) Magic Strings of Frankie Presto, by Mitch Albom. Completed February 2016.
N
O: Orphan Train by Christina Baker Kline. Completed January 2016. 
P
Q
R: (The) Revenant, by Michael Punke. Completed March 2016. 
S
T:  Tiny Beautiful Things, by Cheryl Strayed. Completed April 2016. 
U
V
W: Warm Bodies, by Isaac Marion. Completed February 2016. 
X
Y
Z:  Zone One, by Colson Whitehead. Completed May 2016. 



The City of Mirrors is the third book in The Passage trilogy by Justin Cronin. I loved the first 2 books (The Passage and The Twelve) and this one was great, too. I already posted a review about it, so I won't duplicate it again here, but I did want to share a favorite quote from the book: 

"It's children, he thought, that give us our lives; without them we are nothing, we are here and then gone, like the dust." 



I was so happy to find a Z book at the library that sounded intriguing. This was an audiobook and I really enjoyed the narrator and the story. Here's a synopsis of the book: 

In this wry take on the post-apocalyptic horror novel, a pandemic has devastated the planet. The plague has sorted humanity into two types: the uninfected and the infected, the living and the living dead. 
Now the plague is receding, and Americans are busy rebuild­ing civilization under orders from the provisional govern­ment based in Buffalo. Their top mission: the resettlement of Manhattan. Armed forces have successfully reclaimed the island south of Canal Street—aka Zone One—but pockets of plague-ridden squatters remain. While the army has eliminated the most dangerous of the infected, teams of civilian volunteers are tasked with clearing out a more innocuous variety—the “malfunctioning” stragglers, who exist in a catatonic state, transfixed by their former lives. 
Mark Spitz is a member of one of the civilian teams work­ing in lower Manhattan. Alternating between flashbacks of Spitz’s desperate fight for survival during the worst of the outbreak and his present narrative, the novel unfolds over three surreal days, as it depicts the mundane mission of straggler removal, the rigors of Post-Apocalyptic Stress Disorder, and the impossible job of coming to grips with the fallen world. And then things start to go wrong. 
Both spine chilling and playfully cerebral, Zone One bril­liantly subverts the genre’s conventions and deconstructs the zombie myth for the twenty-first century

 I compare this to The Walking Dead, but more believable. It's funny and sad and disturbing all at once. Somebody on Goodreads described it as "the thinking man's zombie novel" and it's a very apt description. It makes you think about survival, of course, but also about humanity and bureaucracy and materialism. I gave it 4 out of 5 stars.


OK, now it's YOUR turn! Come link up and share what you've read, Andrea and I can't wait to hear all about it. Don't forget to visit other posts and leave some love. Happy Reading!






No comments:

Post a Comment

Roses are red, violets are blue, you know what's awesome? Getting comments from YOU!